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Day 13, 7th April 2014

dilettante noun \ˈdi-lə-ˌtänt, -ˌtant; ˌdi-lə-ˈ\

: a person whose interest in an art or in an area of knowledge is not very deep or serious

1
:  an admirer or lover of the arts
2
:  a person having a superficial interest in an art or a branch of knowledge :  dabbler
— dilettante adjective
— dil·et·tant·ish  adjective
— dil·et·tan·tism  noun
Origin:-
Italian, from present participle of dilettare to delight, from Latin dilectare
First Known Use: 1748

Day 12, 3rd April 2014

vestibule  noun \ˈves-tə-ˌbyül\

: an entrance hall inside a building

1
a :  a passage, hall, or room between the outer door and the interior of a building :  lobby
b :  an enclosed entrance at the end of a railway passenger car
2
:  any of various bodily cavities especially when serving as or resembling an entrance to some other cavity or space: as
a :  the central cavity of the bony labyrinth of the inner ear or the parts (as the saccule and utricle) of the membranous labyrinth that it contains
b :  the part of the left ventricle below the aortic orifice
c :  the space between the labia minora containing the orifice of the urethra
d :  the part of the mouth cavity outside the teeth and gums
3
:  a course that offers access (as to something new)
— ves·ti·buled  adjective
Origin:-
Latin vestibulum forecourt
First Known Use: 1726
noun \ˈves-tə-ˌbyül\   (Medical Dictionary)
: any of various bodily cavities especially when serving as or resembling an entrance to some other cavity or space: as
(1) : the central cavity of the bony labyrinth of the ear
(2) : the parts of the membranous labyrinth comprising the utricle and the saccule and contained in the cavity of the bony labyrinth
b 
: the space between the labia minora containing the orifice of the urethra
c 
: the part of the left ventricle of the heart immediately below the aortic orifice
d 
: the part of the mouth cavity outside the teeth and gums

Day 11, 28th March 2014

غازي noun ġāzī

means warrior or raider. The word became a borrow word in other languages spoken by Muslims, especially Turkish, and the institution of Ghazis was especially developed by the Turks. It is derived from from ghazawa, meaning “he raided” or “he made war”, and was applied to warriors who had vowed to combat the infidels. The Ghazi is a type of Mujaheed.

However, the term Ghazi actually seems to be used to refer to several different types of warriors or individuals:

1- A general term for any Islamic warrior.

2- A term for a kind of border guerilla, Islamic knight or mercenary, used both by the Arabian and later by the Ottoman Empire to expand their borders by raiding enemy areas repeatedly and softening up the populace to make them more willing to submit to Islamic rule through terror and brigandage.

-The ghazi generally lived off plunder and could be rewarded for his services with a territory given to him as a fiefdom. In some respects, this parallels the use of pirates and mercenaries in 16th and 17th century Europe, particularly by the British against the Spanish and Portuguese, and by various parties in the Thirty Years War in Germany. But whereas the brigands and mercenaries of Europe were eventually viewed as a danger and their use was discarded, the ghazi tradition was institutionalized in Muslim culture through its religious significance, much like the prestige awarded the Christian Crusaders. 

3 - A term of respect and title of honor taken by the leaders of imperial dynasties, and particularly by Ottoman Sultans, the first nine of whom included it in their titles:

By early Ottoman times it had become a title of honor and a claim to leadership. In an inscription of 1337 Orhan, second ruler of the Ottoman line, describes himself as “Sultan, son of the Sultan of the Gazis, Gazi son of Gazi… march lord of the horizons.” The Ottoman poet Ahmedi, writing ca. 1402, defines a gazi as “the instruments of God’s religion, a servant of God who cleanses the earth from the filth of polytheism… the sword of God.” (Lewis, Bernard, The Political Language of Islam, University of Chicago Press, pp. 147–148, note 8)

Source:- http://www.mideastweb.org